It Starts With Your Energy

Energy

 

So, how do you “work smart with heart”?

Well, one sure way is to stop worrying.

I know, easy for me to say.

But you know what? In many ways, it is very easy for me to say. See, I was born worried.

Even when I was a kid, I fretted:

Was I doing it right?

Maybe I was doing something wrong without even knowing it.

What were people thinking?

What if there was an accident?

What if the conversation went the wrong way?

Perhaps I’m clueless and nobody really likes me.

I could be broke.

Something bad could happen.

And you know what? With that mindset, it often did.

My worries birthed reality. Which made things more difficult.

Much more. Difficult.

Finally, I came to the place where I realized that I had 100 units of energy to spend every day, and if I could stop slicing and dicing them up with worry, then I might actually be able to get more done.

[Some days, to be honest with you, it was "get something done at all."]

My 100 Units of Energy Theory is this: If you have 100 units of energy to spend each day – and you can’t save up from yesterday because those are spent, and you can’t borrow from tomorrow because those belong to tomorrow – then using what you’ve got to get where you want to go is critical.

And spending twenty or thirty units on worry is totally misplaced energy.

Worry gets in the way of honoring your priorities. Of growing. Of insight.

Of everything, come to think of it.

Worry tries to insure a future outcome. But who among us truly knows what the future holds? I sure don’t. Sure, be reasonably prepared and take care of yourself – I sure do. But why not also be reasonably open to whatever comes?

You’re resilient, and you’ve weathered challenges before – and you’re still here, right? You must be doing something right.

I imagine you’re doing a lot right.

So, working smart – with heart – means candidly looking at how you’re using your energy today and asking yourself, “How much am I putting into worry? How can I re-program these units into something better for me?”

Because you can worry about all the bad stuff that might possibly happen…or you can actively make good stuff happen.

Your choice.